Showing posts with label Black History Month. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Black History Month. Show all posts

06 August 2019

Zen Pencils - Inspirational Quotes Adapted Into Cartoons

Cartoon quotes from famous folks who inspire us - Presented to you by ZenPencils.com.

Discovered this site because it showed up in the post stream via Tumblr.com. Someone has taken one of Maya Angelou's well-known poems - “Phenomenal Woman” - and presented it in comic strip format. Their artistic endeavor was … in a word … phenomenal!

The image supplied with this post is a partial view of his work. To view the entire comic strip, click here .


Gavin Aung Than is the talented cartoonist who creates these “essential” moments in time.

You can submit a quote and he will create a cartoon or comic for it. He has done quotes by Kahlil Gibran, Eleanor Roosevelt, Lao Tzu, Winston Churchill and many more.

If you have a few hours, a slow day, nothing much going on … spend some time perusing this site. You'll leave inspired.

♥ In Memory of: - Maya Angelou (1928 – 2014)



Official Website: zenpencils.com 
♦ Tumblr Blog: zenpencils.tumblr.com

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Content first appeared Feb 2015 at:  Persona Paper

28 August 2018

Michael Jackson (August 29, 1958 – June 25, 2009)

Michael Jackson was so much more than an eclectic and consummate entertainer. He was an extremely generous humanitarian and would no doubt like for people to remember his love and genuine care and concern for children.

“HEAL THE KIDS” SPEECH at OXFORD UNIVERSITY 2001(Excerpt):


As you all know, our two countries broke from each other over what Thomas Jefferson referred to as “certain inalienable rights”. And while we Americans and British might dispute the justice of his claims, what has never been in dispute is that children have certain inalienable rights, and the gradual erosion of those rights has led to scores of children worldwide being denied the joys and security of childhood. I would therefore like to propose tonight that we install in every home a Children’s Universal Bill of Rights, the tenets of which are:



1. The right to be loved without having to earn it


2. The right to be protected, without having to deserve it


3. The right to feel valuable, even if you came into the world with nothing


4. The right to be listened to without having to be interesting


5. The right to be read a bedtime story, without having to compete with the evening news


6. The right to an education without having to dodge bullets at schools


7. The right to be thought of as adorable – (even if you have a face that only a mother could love).

Michael Jackson

BLACK IN TIME: A Moment In OUR History: 


Remembering Michael Joseph Jackson
(August 29, 1958 – June 25, 2009)

13 July 2018

Small Town USA - Greenville, Texas (near Dallas)

Back in 2011, Forbes magazine prepared a TOP 10 List of cities considered to be “economic superstars”. They were recognized as a “superstar” because they have relatively low housing prices, and somehow experienced an increase in new jobs, and managed to keep their economies afloat. The List included 4 Texas cities. - Austin, Texas was Number 1; - San Antonio was Number 4 on the List; - Houston, Number 5; and - Dallas, Number 7.
- Read more at:  "The Next Big Boom Towns in the U.S." https://web.archive.org/web/20161202135817/http://finance.yahoo.com/news/pf_article_113083.html

Austin is the state capital; and in the same way Cedar Park, Texas benefits from being a part of the Greater Austin community, Greenville, Texas is a “small town” that likely benefits from their proximity to Dallas, one of the places named as an economic superstar. Downtown Greenville is an easy 45 minute trip from Dallas, Texas.

The 2015 estimated population projection for this city is less than 30,000. That's close enough to meeting my definition of having small town charm.


Greenville, TX is north of Dallas in Northeast, Texas. 

Map found at greenville-texas.com




Here are a just a few facts to peak your interest in this colorful U.S. city.


Greenville was established in 1846. It was famous for a sign that read "Welcome to Greenville, The Blackest Land, The Whitest People"

This sign was hung over the main street in the downtown area from the 1920s to the 1960s. Between the 1960s and 1970s, the sign was changed to "The Blackest Land, The Greatest People"

Eventually, the sign was just taken down. The fertile black soil of the area resulted in excellent cotton production, and Greenville became known as the "cotton capital of the world".

 
Times have changed for the better and the new attitude is reflected in the City's vision statement:

“The vision of the City of Greenville is to build on our hometown values and rich heritage as a diverse community, by providing cost-effective, quality services to create an enjoyable vibrant place where families and business choose to live, grow and prosper.”

Image credit: Old map of Greenville, TX, 1891; Public Domain; Wikimedia Commons

16 February 2018

Learn a part of American history that is practically unknown.

The Feast of All Saints” is an adaptation of a book by Ms. Rice about people of color, not slaves but free, who lived in New Orleans, Louisiana during the 19th century.


Learn a part of American history that is practically unknown.




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If you like The Feast of All Saints, you might also like "Belle".











The Practice of Human Bondage

When did slavery begin? Its practice was commonplace during biblical times; the Bible weaves intricate details of slavery into the accounts of daily lives. 

Continue reading: 

The Practice of Human Bondage: When Did Slavery Begin?



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Image credit:  Slaves Zadib Yemen 13th century BNF Paris, Wikimedia Commons

Augusta Savage (1892 - 1962) : The Harp

Ever hear the expression "one thing leads to another".

Well I'd like to elaborate.
  • One GOOD thing leads to another.
Worked that way for me!

Published an article about the African-American harpist Jeff Majors who was asked to perform at the funeral of Coretta Scott King.

Oprah was so moved she invited him to come on her TV show.

Here is the link to my article about Mr. Majors:

Harp Music: Sacred, Classical, Jazz or Gospel?

Now a well-known and much appreciated African-American artist/composer/harpist, Jeff Majors followed his dream. Literally. He actually had a dream about playing the harp and decided he would learn.He was taught by the late Alice Coltrane (1937 -2007), jazz pianist and harpist, and the spouse of the legendary John Coltrane (1926 -1967).Once he mastered the instrument, he set out to share his musical gift with others.


Writing about the contributions of this extraordinary harpist is the "One GOOD thing" that led to "another".  The "another" is accidentally discovering an African-American artist I had never heard of: Augusta Savage (1892 - 1962).  What's the connection?



Augusta Savage, sculpting - NARA - 559182
Augusta Savage, sculpting - NARA - 559182 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
This remarkable artist was commissioned to create a sculpture for the New York World's Fair in 1939.   Her magnificent work was called "The Harp".  It was exhibited.  It received much acclaim.  But what happened after that is sinful.  Her work was destroyed!!!  The word used in the article was "demolished".  I had to read it several times because I thought my eyes were playing tricks on me.  Inside my mind there was no corner where piercing screams could not be heard.
NO!  NO! NO!!!

Oh well!  At least there are pictures.

Here is the link to the article I found accidentally about Ms. Savage:  American Art Today: "The Harp" by Augusta Savage.


The Harp by Augusta Savage

'The Harp' by Augusta Savage - 1939 New York World's Fair - Community Interests Zone



Instead of being discouraged, Ms. Savage continued her artistic pursuits and was an active participant in the Harlem Renaissance, a cultural movement during the 1920s and 30s where many black artists - painters poets, sculptors, musicians, actors, etc. - used their talents and creativity to be reborn.  America is blessed by this "blossoming" as it has been called.  Any nation that allows its citizens the freedom to express their hearts and minds by using their individual God-given gifts to benefit a greater good can not help but reap the bounty.

Previously published at Black Art in America on June 5, 2013 


http://amzn.to/2eEHwF8

In Her Hands: The Story of Sculptor Augusta Savage








04 February 2018

Former Slave Who Sued Master For Back Wages!

Since it's February – Black History Month - Americans usually use the entire month to shine the spotlight on the contributions of black or African Americans, I am reminded of a fascinating article about a woman named Belinda, a former slave who sued her owner/master for back wages and WON!!!



Brenda Barnes is a writer who crossed my path via Wizzley.com. Even though she only contributed two articles, the subject matter discussed is worth recycling.



Belinda's Petition: A Concise History of Reparations For The TransAtlantic Slave Trade

 






Follow Cmoneyspinner's HomeBiz Projects's board Black History Tribute on Pinterest.


The Black History of the White House

 

    Silas Watts



01 February 2018

Black in Time | Online Resource for Black History

Although February has been officially designated as Black History Month and is observed in the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom, Black In Time is an excellent online resource for black history and culture all year-round. The tagline for the website states its purpose succinctly: Celebrating Who We Are By Honoring Who We Were. Brief biographical snapshots and historical accounts are presented by way of A Moment in OUR History links that acquaint us with Americans of African heritage - such as: 

Bessie Coleman, the first licensed black pilot...
Bessie Coleman, the first licensed black pilot in the United States (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

- Bessie Coleman (1922, successful female pilot who broke through racial and gender barriers), 

- Henry O. Flipper (former slave who realized his childhood dream by graduating from The West Point United States Military Academy in 1877), 

- Garrett A. Morgan (invented and patented the gas mask; became a national hero in 1916 when he donned the breathing device and led a rescue team into a tunnel to save 30 workers trapped there after an explosion), 

- Dr. Carter G. Woodson (scholar, historian, educator and author, honored as The Father Of Black History; in 1926 he created what is known today as Black History Month). 

English: Portrait of African-American historia...
Portrait of African-American historian Carter Godwin Woodson as a young man. Courtesy of the New River Gorge National River website, National Park Service, Dept of the Interior, US Gov'. (Wikipedia)
This site is a research and reference tool intended to assist those interested in tracing the steps of generations from the days of slavery to the present; and its goal is to motivate anyone to create positive, unique stories within their own lives.

Hugh Gaddy is Founder and President of Black In Time Enterprises. You can view his public profile on LinkedIn.com. When asked if there was any one historical personality in particular that really motivated and inspired him, Mr. Gaddy responded: Without question, Malcolm X!! I read his autobiography when I was 15 and it changed my life!!

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Do you get inspired by reading
biographical accounts or personal memoirs?

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08 January 2018

MAYA ANGELOU - STILL I RISE

Honoring Dr. Maya Angelou, 
American Author & Poet (1928 - 2014).  

“I speak to the black experience, but I am always talking about the human condition -- about what we can endure, dream, fail at, and still survive.” ― Maya Angelou (Quote Source)

Celebrating Ms. Angelou's contributions to literature.  She has earned her rightful place among the great poets and writers, not just in American literature, but in world literature.  He writings speak to the soul and heart of every individual and about the life of every human being, not just to the African-American experience.


Image credit: President Barack Obama presenting Maya Angelou with the Presidential Medal of Freedom : Wikipedia; Public Domain





Cartoon quotes from famous folks who inspire us - Presented to you by ZenPencils.com

Discovered this site because it showed up in the post stream via Tumblr.com. This artist has taken one of Maya Angelou's well-known poems - “Phenomenal Woman” - and presented it in comic strip format. Their artistic endeavor was … in a word … phenomenal!  ~  View the entire comic strip.




17 July 2017

In Case You Were Thinking of Becoming a Writer | Motivational Quotes

Hi! Have you ever thought about becoming a writer?  Any kind of writer? Book writer. Poetry. Articles. Blogger.  Sharing a few inspirational quotes by female writers who have inspired me.


Other writers thought about becoming a writer, before they decided. Something got them started. When they were well on their way, something kept them going.


“When I was about eight, I decided that the most wonderful thing, next to a human being, was a book.”
― Margaret Walker (1915 – 1998)
(Dr. Margaret Abigail Walker Alexander)
http://www.goodreads.com/author/quotes/9660.Margaret_Walker


“I am a writer perhaps because I am not a talker.”
― Gwendolyn Brooks (1917 – 2000)
http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/25128.Gwendolyn_Brooks


“I speak to the black experience, but I am always talking about the human condition — about what we can endure, dream, fail at, and still survive.”
― Maya Angelou (1928 – )
http://womenshistory.about.com/cs/quotes/a/qu_maya_angelou.htm


“You might as well answer the door, my child,
the truth is furiously knocking.”
― Lucille Clifton, Good Woman: Poems and a Memoir 1969-1980

“I don’t write out of what I know; I write out of what I wonder. […] Poetry and art are not about answers to me; they are about questions.”
― Lucille Clifton (1936 – )
http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/183177.Lucille_Clifton


“Going to the library was the one place we got to go without asking for permission. And they let us choose what we wanted to read. It was a feeling of having a book be mine entirely.”
― Rita Frances Dove (1952 – )
http://linguaspectrum.com/quotations/by_author_english.php?quoteoftheday_author=Rita%20Dove


* Intro image credit: Clipart found at i2clipart.com and Pixabay.com

Content first posted at TreasurePen,



25 May 2017

Jazz, America's Original Art Form ~ Cool Finds Around the Web

"Jazz does not belong to one race or culture, but is a gift that America has given the world."
- Ahmad Alaadeen








Browse additional posters and prints from zazzle.com.
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21 March 2017

Spotlight on Gwendolyn Elizabeth Brooks (1917 - 2000)

"I am a writer perhaps because I am not a talker."  

- -  Gwendolyn Brooks (1917 “ 2000) 


February was Black History Month and March is Womens History Month and Ms. Brooks get the spotlight for both of these “dedicated time periods”. She is worthy of the honor.

A biography snapshot of African-American poet, Gwendolyn Elizabeth Brooks (Jun 7, 1917 - Dec 3, 2000).



  • Gwendolyn Elizabeth Brooks is a noted African-American Poet Laureate.  

  • She published her first poem at age 14.  

  • Her beginnings were humble.  She was born in Topeka, Kansas but her family moved to Chicago (the South side, i.e. with the rest of the poor folks) when she was young.  When she grew up, she attended Wilson Junior College in Chicago, graduating in 1936.  

  • She was the first African-American (male or female) to be awarded the Pulitzer Prize; in 1950, the category for Poetry.  Her award-winning poetry was titled "Annie Allen (1949)".

  • Ms. Brooks utilized her poetic prowess for expressing her emotions, beliefs and perspectives.  She had very strong opinions about family life, war and social ethics.  Current events of her day, led her to adapt her writing style from humor and irony to a more deeply serious tone in order to address politics and racism and the real assassinations of activists Malcolm X and Medgar Evers.  

  • Over the years, her works have reached a wide and diverse audience.  She has earned the respect of many for her sincerity, quiet strength, dedication and her life's accomplishments have left an indelible mark in literature and in history.   

Ms. Brooks departed this life on December 3, 2000, at age 83.  

To sum up her writings in her own words:
"Poetry is life distilled." 


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28 February 2017

Little Known Black History Fact: Lee Wesley Gibson

Mr. Gibson or “George” passed away at the age of 107 and is noted in the records as the oldest surviving member of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters.





Ben Isaacs dies at 107; oldest Pullman porter

  • Obituary published August 18, 2012 in LA Times: Excerpt:  “Records kept by the A. Philip Randolph Pullman Porter Museum in Chicago had recognized 102-year-old Lee Wesley Gibson of Los Angeles as being the oldest living Pullman porter until Isaacs — born five years earlier than Gibson — came forward in 2010.”


Originally posted on Majic 102.1:
At 101 years old, Lee Wesley Gibson of Keatchie, Louisiana is the oldest surviving member of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters. Gibson served as a pullman porter for 38 years. Back in the day, the job of pullman porter was considered a middle-class position, something Gibson, who was raised by a poor single mom, took pride in.



05 November 2014

The Early Rainbow Coalition

Born and raised in Florida and the Seminoles were the first real American Indians that I had ever seen. Happy to recycle this information a friend on Google Plus shared with me as part of the November celebration for Native American Heritage Month

 

 

“On Christmas day 1837, 176 years ago, the Africans and Native Americans who formed Florida’s Seminole Nation defeated a vastly superior U.S. invading army bent on cracking this early rainbow coalition and returning the Africans to slavery. …”

Read more:  “Christmas Day Freedom Fighters: Hidden History of the Seminole Anticolonial Struggle” by William Loren Katz: http://bit.ly/1bqgtzD


(Image: Attack of the Seminoles on the blockhouse. Image: WikiCommons.)



An abandoned British fort from the war of 1812 was once occupied by a group of escaped slaves who found refuge and acceptance among the local tribes. The fort and the Spanish control of Florida offered some defense but the U.S. government sent an expeditionary military raid to terminate the outlaw colony. In the summer of 1816, the fort on the Apalachicola River was destroyed and nearly all its inhabitants.


WARRIORS FROM BONDAGE
30″ X 48″ Oil Painting by Jackson Walker of the attack of Negro Fort on the Apalachicola River, 1816. Jackson Walker Florida Artist, Florida History Paintings, Military History Paintings, Legandary Florida, US History, Florida Landscape Paintings




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